Huygen on Titan – Digital Illustration

Two views of Huygen on Titan

Last month I was asked to exhibit at the Space Foundation’s Discovery Center in Colorado Springs. While I was there I took some pictures of the various space artifacts that were on display. On loan from NASA, was a full scale mock-up of the Huygens probe that landed on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. I decided to try to use the photos to illustrate the probe on the surface of Titan. Above is the result. This gave me the chance to experiment with soft-body dynamics to make the parachute drape over the surface I had created. Below are the photos I took at the Space Discovery Center.

Asteroid Chariklo-Digital Illustration

Asteroid Chariklo

In 2013 seven ground-based telescopes watch Asteroid Chariklo as it passed in front of a bright star, an event known as an occultation. A reduction in the amount of light preceding and after the asteroid passed in front of the star confirmed that there is a ring around it. Making Chariklo the fifth object in our solar system and the smallest to have a ring system. Chariklo is only about 150 miles wide with a double ring that spans about 10 miles. Chariklo orbits between Saturn and Uranus.

Space Foundation Art after Dark Show

Art and Ale show

I would like to thank the Space Foundation for inviting me to exhibit my artwork during their Art and Ales event. It was a great venue, with many people excited about space and aerospace. I brought seven framed prints and presented how some of them were created on the iPad. You can learn more about the space foundation at www.discoverspace.org/. Great group of people and I hope I have the opportunity to do more events there.

The Last Resting Place of Philae on Comet 67P

Last Resting Place of Philae

Last Resting Place of Philae


My depiction of the Philae comet lander in it’s final position after it had bounced twice in it’s landing attempt. This illustration is based on the images capturing the lander resting on it’s side in a chasm on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. You can view the lander in it’s final resting place here. This illustration shows the Rosetta orbiter in the background.

Juno Mission – Digital Illustration

Juno Mission

On July 4th the Juno spacecraft will transition from space flight to orbit. After five years in space and approaching Jupiter at a mind boggling speed of 165,000 mph. The spacecraft will fire it’s thrusters, putting it in a wide polar orbit. The first two orbits will take over a hundred days to complete. Juno also has the distinction of being the farthest spacecraft to use solar power. The polar orbit will keep the spacecraft oriented to the sun. Juno’s suite of instruments will provide a wealth of information about Jupiter’s magnetic field, auroras, composition and atmosphere.

Juno over the Great Red Spot

Juno over the Great Red Spot

The Juno model was built and rendered in Lightwave 3D. The thermal blankets (foil) was modeled in Sculprtis. Image enhancements in Photoshop. Prints and merchandise can be purchased here.

Juno Mission

Enhanced Cygnus Cargo Spacecraft – Digital Illustration

Enhanced Cygnus Spacecraft by Orbital ATK

Enhanced Cygnus Spacecraft by Orbital ATK

Enhanced Cygnus Spacecraft

Orbital ATK’s Cygnus spacecraft that has been making regular deliveries of cargo to the International Space Station. Orbital ATK and it’s partners, have upgraded the Cygnus from 2000 kg of cargo to 3,200 kg in it’s pressurized cargo module. The rectangular accordion solar panels have been replaced by the lighter Ultraflex solar arrays. You can view my illustration of the previous version here

The background is drawn or painted on the Apple iPad using the Sketchbook Pro app and the Apple Pencil. The foreground is modeled and rendered in Lightwave 3d. Photoshop was used to create some texture maps.

cygnus-enhanced cargo spacecraft