EXOWORLDS – A Visual Exploration

EXOWORLDS a Visual Exploration from Raymond Cassel on Vimeo.

Inspiration for this series comes from NASA imagery of Jupiter and its moons. In particular an image from Voyager 1 of Europa passing near Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, casting a shadow on the surface. The moon dwarfed by Jupiter’s clouds, shows the immense scale of the planet. Additionally the amazing images being sent my the Juno probe currently orbiting Jupiter have provided a new source of inspiration.

These images were created with practical photography of ink and paints suspended in water. The photos were stitched together to create the atmospheres of these exoplanets. 3-D software was used to create and animate the moons. Music and sound design provided by Mark Mosher. You can hear his wondeful work at modulateThis.com.

The recent discovery of abundant planets indicates to us that out in the universe there may well be an analog to even the most outlandish ideas we artists dream up.

If you like what you see, prints can be order here.

ArtStation Keyframe Challenge – Europa

Boring into the icy surface of Europa

In an effort to improve my visual storytelling I entered Artstation’s Keyframe Challenge. The theme for this competition is “Beneath the Waves”. I used this as a chance to visually explore what a mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa might look like. The challenge is to come up with four cinematic keyframes or moments of a story. Also a chance to reacquaint myself with volumetric lighting in my 3-D scenes. You can view my entry and see my ideation and supporting illustrations here. Be sure to check out the many other amazing entries as well.

Two autonomous subs are released into Europa’s ocean.

AEAC SunFlyer – Product Visualization

SunFlyer 4seat Visualization from Raymond Cassel on Vimeo.

I have been assisting Aero Electric Aircraft Corporation (AEAC) with illustrations of their all electric aircraft. While work continues on their two-seat aircraft. They wanted me to illustrate the next version, a four-seat aircraft. Above is an animation of the four-seat version in flight. The animation is designed to loop for their website and for tradeshow displays. You can learn more about the SunFlyer here. You can view some of my previous work for them here.

SunFlyer Illustrations

Great American Eclipse – Digital Illustrations

I was fortunate to get to see and experience the total eclipse today. There is nothing like actually seeing it in person. You could actually see the red solar prominences coming off the sun with the unaided eye. It didn’t get as dark as I thought it would, but it got much cooler then I expected. And the rooster in the distance was a nice touch. I manages six photos during totality using a 200mm lens and a 1/50th shutter setting. The illustration above was created using my photos as reference. I have updated the illustration I created yesterday to match what I saw.

My photos of the 2017 eclipse taken from Ontario, OR.

High Altitude Eclipse – Digital Illustration

It’s getting hard to contain my excitement for the Great American Solar Eclipse. The first total eclipse visible from coast to coast in over a century. I’ve been fascinated by some images showing the eclipse from a high altitude. I’ve seen several mocked up images, that don’t seem to correctly show the event. Above is my illustration based a few reference photos. I have also placed the planets that may also be visible during the brief moment of totality. Below is a time lapse video of the drawing. I may update this illustration after the eclipse on August 21.

High Altitude Eclipse from Raymond Cassel on Vimeo.

Eclipse with planets labeled

Mira A and B – Digital Illustration

Mira A is a variable red giant star estimated to be about 700 times larger then our own sun. While Mira A has been observed since the 1600’s, it’s companion star Mira B was discovered in the early 1900’s. This depiction illustrates the stellar material transfering from the red giant to it’s smaller companion. This forms a disk of material around the smaller star. These stars are shown as they would appear in visible light.